Into the beam
I was a Flower of the mountain yes when I put the rose in my hair like the Andalusian girls used or shall I wear a red yes and how he kissed me under the Moorish Wall and I thought well as well him as another and then I asked him with my eyes to ask again yes and then he asked me would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.
-

Ulysses, James Joyce

Happy Bloomsday!

(via randomhouse)

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Check out the trailer for our new book! 

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oupacademic:

'What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?' 
The First World War produced an extraordinary flowering of poetic talent, from poets whose words commemorate the conflict as enduringly as monuments in stone. This new anthology of First World War poetry that brings together the best poetry by soldiers and civilians, including women poets, with a fresh assessment of their work.
Follow our Classics on Twitter or like them on Facebook for more great literature.
oupacademic:

'What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?' 
The First World War produced an extraordinary flowering of poetic talent, from poets whose words commemorate the conflict as enduringly as monuments in stone. This new anthology of First World War poetry that brings together the best poetry by soldiers and civilians, including women poets, with a fresh assessment of their work.
Follow our Classics on Twitter or like them on Facebook for more great literature.

oupacademic:

'What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?'

The First World War produced an extraordinary flowering of poetic talent, from poets whose words commemorate the conflict as enduringly as monuments in stone. This new anthology of First World War poetry that brings together the best poetry by soldiers and civilians, including women poets, with a fresh assessment of their work.

Follow our Classics on Twitter or like them on Facebook for more great literature.

Comments

World’s Best Dad

Last week Tim and I responded to the Q Ideas “Question of the Week”: 

Whatever Happened to Fatherhood

Here’s a tidbit. To read the article in its entirety, head on over to Q Ideas. {Link below}

What happened to the traditions of fatherhood?

As far as I know: nothing.

Dad still sits anxiously in the corner while Mom labors, breathing through her contractions. He still teaches his son how to throw a ball or his daughter how to ride a bike. He still tells corny jokes and complains about the dog and has “first rights” on the last slice of meatloaf.

Dad still ends the night with “in the light of the moon a little egg lay on a leaf.” He still wrestles and tickles and tucks his kids into bed. And, he still wakes up the next morning to do it all over again. Anything else would stand against our social norms and long entrenched understandings of what it means to be a “good dad.”

What has changed, however, are certain portrayals of fatherhood. Flip through the TV and you’re hard-pressed to find the Andy Griffith archetype who instills responsibility, respect, and honesty in his son—the dad who doles out such humble and foundational advice as “when you make a solemn promise to a friend, it ain’t right to go back on it.”

Instead, today’s TV fathers look more like buffoons, hardly able to change a diaper, let alone parent a child. Good Luck Charlie,Shameless, and a host of other shows portray dads as downright incompetent at being the head of a family. When asked once if he read the fine print on a loan contract, Peter, the dad in FamilyGuy, responded with, “Um, if by ‘read’ you mean imagined a naked lady, then, yes.”

This portrayal of fatherhood (and manhood!) in popular comedies is, well, a joke. It’s parody, yes—but it seems we’ve successfully caricatured our way into a view of dads and husbands that strips the role of its dignity and castrates its ability to flourish with the confidence required to see past the drone of television screens and sixpacks of cheap beer.

Read More

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flickernail:

Need a break from the hustle of the season? 
Take 20 minutes and read The Sound of Silence.
Available for free download here
flickernail:

Need a break from the hustle of the season? 
Take 20 minutes and read The Sound of Silence.
Available for free download here

flickernail:

Need a break from the hustle of the season? 

Take 20 minutes and read The Sound of Silence.

Available for free download here

Comments
Envy, of course, doesn’t operate in a social vacuum. It needs an object of desire. And everyone, it seems, has that friend on Instagram: the one with the perfect clothes and the perfect hair and seemingly perfect life — which seem all the more perfect when rendered in the rich teals and vivid ambers of Instagram’s filters.
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oupacademic:


“During my lifetime I have dedicated myself to this struggle of the African People. I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for, and see realized. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

(via In memoriam: Nelson Mandela)
oupacademic:


“During my lifetime I have dedicated myself to this struggle of the African People. I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for, and see realized. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

(via In memoriam: Nelson Mandela)

oupacademic:

“During my lifetime I have dedicated myself to this struggle of the African People. I have fought against white domination, and I have fought against black domination. I have cherished the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony and with equal opportunities. It is an ideal which I hope to live for, and see realized. But if needs be, it is an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

(via In memoriam: Nelson Mandela)

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theartofgooglebooks:

Frontispiece photographed through tissue.
From Good Stories for Great Holidays: Arranged for Story-telling and Reading, ed. by Frances Jenkins Olcott (1914). Original from Harvard University. Digitized April 11, 2007.
theartofgooglebooks:

Frontispiece photographed through tissue.
From Good Stories for Great Holidays: Arranged for Story-telling and Reading, ed. by Frances Jenkins Olcott (1914). Original from Harvard University. Digitized April 11, 2007.

theartofgooglebooks:

Frontispiece photographed through tissue.

From Good Stories for Great Holidays: Arranged for Story-telling and Reading, ed. by Frances Jenkins Olcott (1914). Original from Harvard University. Digitized April 11, 2007.

Comments
oupacademic:

Scholarly Resource Alert! A freely available resource, Italian Renaissance Learning Resources features eight units, each of which explores a different theme in Italian Renaissance art.

Presentation of self: Personal identity and the presentation of self and family through commissioned works of art became important tools for bringing into the spotlight individuals jostling for power in the newly competitive environment of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy. A new self-awareness resulted in the defining of personality, both for oneself and for others.
This unit outlines the different ways in which individual identity was expressed in Renaissance art. Portraiture was a major expression of self-presentation, and the essay highlights the range of portrait types that developed in Italian Renaissance art. Also discussed here is the phenomenon, for the first time on a large scale, of portraits of women, many commissioned by men and some commissioned by women themselves.
The home became a stage for conspicuous and finely tuned display. Objects that announced prosperity and wealth were favorites for home embellishment. Paintings and sculptures were commissioned to celebrate the family’s lineage. The bedroom became a favored site for pointed messages attesting to the virtue of the inhabitants as well as promising fertility.
The unit also includes an examination of the ways in which one family, the Medici of Florence, used art in varied media to focus attention on their status, ambitions, and expectations.

This project is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Art and OUP’s Grove Art Online. It was made possible through the support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.
Image credit: Raphael, Bindo Altoviti, Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art.
oupacademic:

Scholarly Resource Alert! A freely available resource, Italian Renaissance Learning Resources features eight units, each of which explores a different theme in Italian Renaissance art.

Presentation of self: Personal identity and the presentation of self and family through commissioned works of art became important tools for bringing into the spotlight individuals jostling for power in the newly competitive environment of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy. A new self-awareness resulted in the defining of personality, both for oneself and for others.
This unit outlines the different ways in which individual identity was expressed in Renaissance art. Portraiture was a major expression of self-presentation, and the essay highlights the range of portrait types that developed in Italian Renaissance art. Also discussed here is the phenomenon, for the first time on a large scale, of portraits of women, many commissioned by men and some commissioned by women themselves.
The home became a stage for conspicuous and finely tuned display. Objects that announced prosperity and wealth were favorites for home embellishment. Paintings and sculptures were commissioned to celebrate the family’s lineage. The bedroom became a favored site for pointed messages attesting to the virtue of the inhabitants as well as promising fertility.
The unit also includes an examination of the ways in which one family, the Medici of Florence, used art in varied media to focus attention on their status, ambitions, and expectations.

This project is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Art and OUP’s Grove Art Online. It was made possible through the support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.
Image credit: Raphael, Bindo Altoviti, Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art.

oupacademic:

Scholarly Resource Alert! A freely available resource, Italian Renaissance Learning Resources features eight units, each of which explores a different theme in Italian Renaissance art.

Presentation of self: Personal identity and the presentation of self and family through commissioned works of art became important tools for bringing into the spotlight individuals jostling for power in the newly competitive environment of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italy. A new self-awareness resulted in the defining of personality, both for oneself and for others.

This unit outlines the different ways in which individual identity was expressed in Renaissance art. Portraiture was a major expression of self-presentation, and the essay highlights the range of portrait types that developed in Italian Renaissance art. Also discussed here is the phenomenon, for the first time on a large scale, of portraits of women, many commissioned by men and some commissioned by women themselves.

The home became a stage for conspicuous and finely tuned display. Objects that announced prosperity and wealth were favorites for home embellishment. Paintings and sculptures were commissioned to celebrate the family’s lineage. The bedroom became a favored site for pointed messages attesting to the virtue of the inhabitants as well as promising fertility.

The unit also includes an examination of the ways in which one family, the Medici of Florence, used art in varied media to focus attention on their status, ambitions, and expectations.

This project is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Art and OUP’s Grove Art Online. It was made possible through the support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

Image credit: Raphael, Bindo Altoviti, Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art.

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Captain Von Trapp

The only interesting thing @jonathanmerritt has posted in weeks, a link to this:

http://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/i-regret-to-inform-you-that-my-wedding-to-captain-von-trapp-has-been-canceled

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How rock is made. 

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